Archives for posts with tag: reds
Yasiel Puig surprises Mark Ellis from behind as Ellis bobbles the ball and the Yankees score two.

Yasiel Puig surprises Mark Ellis from behind as Ellis bobbles the ball and the Yankees score two. Photo by Gina Ferrazzi/Los Angeles Times

You take the good, you take the bad,
You take them both and there you have
The facts of life, the facts of life!

 It’s a fact that the Dodgers will not win every single game they play.

After sneaking by, 3-2, in the first game of this two-day visit from the Yanks with a walk-off RBI single by Mark Ellis, it was almost fitting that the end of the second game come in the form of a costly error by the same Mark Ellis (although in my opinion, the mistake was all Yasiel Puig’s). Final score: New York 3, Dodgers 0.

But if it makes you feel any better, we probably wouldn’t have won anyway. The Yankees had already scored a run when, with two men on, Ellis and Puig collided in right field while trying to catch what would have been the third out of the top of the ninth. And with New York closer Mariano Rivera on his farewell tour, you know we almost certainly would not have scored anyway.

But, hey, it’s just one game, one of only seven lost in the last 34. That’s pretty spectacular, if you ask me. It even has Steve wondering if we shouldn’t cave and get a miniplan after all.

So far, I’m hanging tough.

Ian Kennedy has been traded to the Padres.

Ian Kennedy has been traded to the Padres.

Public Enemy No. 1 Now a Padre
That’s right, folks! The D’bags traded our favorite beanballer, Ian Kennedy, to San Diego. Without Kirk Gibson behind him, I wonder if there will be as many head shots.

I’m glad Ian is getting back to Southern California. Maybe it will bring back the mellow surfer in him, instead of the head-hunting monster. He didn’t seem to be the same guy once he got to Arizona.

I hope he thrives in San Diego and does even better than he did in 2011. Just stay away from the heads of my Dodgers!

Matt Kemp greets Yasiel Puig after his walk-off home run.

Matt Kemp greets Yasiel Puig after his walk-off home run.

We struck out more than ever before (20 times altogether). Several players whiffed three times! One of them was Yasiel Puig. But you know what? The only at-bat that mattered was the last one, when the Manna From Havana sent an 0-1 pitch into the left-field pavilion in the 11th inning and then slid home to avoid the human wrecking balls that his teammates had become as he rounded the bases.

With the 1-0 win, the Dodgers took the series from the Cincinnati Reds, a really good team with the best bullpen in the National League.

Their pitchers were good. Starter Tony Cingrani fanned 11 Dodgers all by himself. But in the end, ours were just a little bit better. Starter Chris Capuano allowed just three hits in 6⅔ innings, and then Ronald Belisario, Paco Rodriguez, Kenley Jansen and Brandon (I take back every bad thing I’ve ever said) League blanked them through the last 4⅓. League even notched his third consecutive win. Amazing!

 

zombie dodgersThe Dodgers are the hottest zombies in the Major Leagues.

After having been written off as dead in the water — Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times wrote on June 21 that they were “the most disappointing team in baseball” — they have come back to life with a vengeance. I have completely lost count of how many games the Dodgers have won since then (I think it’s like 28 or 29), but I know there have only been six losses. That’s, like, insane!

Dodger pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu won the game on which all Korean eyes were focussed.

Dodger pitcher Hyun-Jin Ryu won the game on which all Korean eyes were focussed.

Yesterday, Hyun-Jin Ryu won the Korean war, and he did it in style! Against the Cincinnati Reds and Ryu’s fellow countryman Shin-Soo Choo, Ryu went seven innings, giving up only one run on two hits and striking out nine as the Dodgers beat the Reds, 4-1, at the Ravine.

The Reds' Shin-Soo Choo has played in the majors since 2005 with a career .289 batting average.

The Reds’ Shin-Soo Choo has played in the majors since 2005 with a career .289 batting average.

The game — played on the 60th anniversary of the Korean War armistice — brought out tons of Korean baseball lovers, media and photographers. Ryu and Choo had played together on the Korean World Baseball Championship team, but never against each other in the major leagues.

Don Mattingly, asked before the game if he was worried Ryu would be too nervous to pitch well, said, “No. If anything, I expect he’ll rise to the occasion.” Well, that he did, Donny-boy, that he did.

And the Dodgers continue their phenomenal domination of the past few weeks. On Friday, they squeaked out a 2-1 win on a two-run homer by Hanley Ramirez and sensational pitching by the man, Clayton Kershaw. He just keeps getting better and better.